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Fall 2019

Undergraduate Courses

ENG 105 Introduction to Creative Writing
M/W 2:15-3:35 PM
Instructor: TBA
This course is designed to introduce the student to three types of creative writing: poetry, fiction and nonfiction. The course will focus on inspiration (why write a poem or a story or an essay?) as well as the techniques of evocative, compelling writing across all literary genres (e.g. point of view, concrete detail, lyricism, image, metaphor, simile, voice, tone, structure, dialogue, and characterization). Students will read and analyze work by authors from various traditions and produce creative work in each genre. ETS 105 prepares students for upper-level creative writing courses in fiction and poetry.

ENG 107 M001 Living Writers
W 3:45-6:30 PM

ENG 107- M002 through M010
W 3:45-6:30 PM
Instructor: Staff
This class gives students the rare opportunity to hear visiting writers read and discuss their work. The class is centered on six readings and question-and-answer sessions. Students will be responsible for careful readings of the writers’ work. Critical writing and detailed class discussions are required to prepare for the question-and-answer sessions with the visiting writers. The first class meets in Gifford Auditorium.

ENG 114 M001 British Literature, 1789-present
T/TH 2:00- 3:20 PM
Instructor: Michael Goode
Few nations in the world have changed more dramatically over the past 250 years than Great Britain, and these changes are evident throughout its literature. This course moves briskly through just over two centuries of Britain’s literary history, covering the art and culture of four distinct periods: Romantic, Victorian, Modern, and Post-War/Postmodern/Postcolonial. Historical topics will include: slavery; political revolution; the industrial revolution; the Enlightenment; urbanization; evolution; religion; social reform movements; the politics of race, class, gender, and sexuality; nationalism; imperialism; colonialism and its aftermath; the World Wars; postmodernism; the politics of choosing to write in English; Brexit; and the history of literary forms. Readings will include novels, poems, plays, and song lyrics by writers such as William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge, John Clare, Olaudah Equiano, Charlotte Smith, Jane Austen, Robert Browning, Tennyson, Charles Dickens, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde, W. B. Yeats, Wilfred Owen, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Graham Greene, Sam Selvon, Linton Kwesi Johnson, Johnny Rotten, Bob Marley, Ian McEwan, and Zadie Smith. Assignments will include three five-page papers and a final examination.

ENG 119 M001 US Fiction 1940-2015
T/TH 9:30- 10:50 AM
Instructor: Susan Edmunds
Course Description: This course offers a survey of U.S. fiction, poetry, literary journalism and autobiographical writing dating from the late 1940s through the early 2000s. We will interpret assigned literary texts through a sociohistorical lens, and place particular emphasis on investigating the interconnections between literary form and social change. After an initial survey of fiction and autobiographical prose written in direct response to World War II and its aftermath, we will read texts associated with or influenced by the counterculture, the Vietnam War, the Civil Rights, Black Power and Black Arts Movements, Second Wave Feminism, and the 1965 Immigration and Nationality Act.

Readings will include Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse Five, Toni Morrison’s Tar Baby, and Lê Thi Diem Thúy’s The Gangster We Are All Looking For, as well as shorter texts by Bernard Malamud, Hisaye Yamamoto. James Baldwin, Michael Herr, Allen Ginsberg, Toni Cade Bambara, Grace Paley, Sergio Troncoso, and Gloria Anzaldúa.

ENG 119 M002 Topics in US Literature and History: Experimental & Emerging Genres 1980-Present
MW 3:45- 5:05 PM
Instructor: John Colasacco
Because all writing is experimental, and no work considered valuable and excellent fails to test, reconfigure, or broaden the language, a course devoted to the recent history of experimental and emerging genres will need to examine & seek new patterns of expression in a range of exemplary texts and cultural artifacts, with emphasis on close reading practices, attention to rhetorical/historical contexts, and strategies for effective response/critique. In particular, the past forty years will frame our study of the rapidly expanding diversity of voices and forms that lead to our current understandings of literary art. Historically, experimentalism sharpens under regressive regimes; in this class, student writers committed to the idea that the stories that need to be written are the ones that can’t be told will find a through-line to their ambitious forbears, and will better understand how to read and create the texts that define literary/American history.

ENG 121 M001 Introduction to Shakespeare
M/W 11:40-12:35 PM
Discussion Section M002 F 10:35am-11:30am
Discussion Section M003 F 10:35am-11:30am
Discussion Section M004 F 11:40am-12:35pm
Discussion Section M005 F 11:40am-12:35pm
Instructor: Stephanie Shirilan
This course offers an introduction to Shakespeare’s worlds through attentive study of a selection of plays that will include examples of each of the dramatic genres: history, comedy, tragedy, and romance. These plays, and the approaches we will take to them, have been chosen to challenge the interpretive models by which you may have been introduced to Shakespeare in the past. We will move beyond the little world of man and the wheel of fortune to consider Shakespeare's unexpected representations of historical norms and enormities, cultural codes and cultural change, modes of governance, styles of comportment, and varieties of belief. Even while we consider the cultural import of reading Shakespeare in (and outside) of the Western canon, our discussions will constantly return to a central problem: What does it mean to read Shakespeare when Shakespeare wrote plays to be played upon a stage?

ENG 122 M001 Introduction to the Novel
M/W 3:45-5:05 PM
Instructor: Adam Kozaczka
It has been argued that we encounter the world and define ourselves according to the ways of knowing learned from reading novels: the characters we know develop, the plots we set into motion reach their climaxes, and we divide our lives into chapters. This course studies the development of the novel as a literary form and examines how its structures and functions organize lived experience along a range of formal and ideological paradigms. How do novels define crime and transgression? How do they script marriage and idealize love? How do they construct character according to identity metrics like gender, sexuality, class, or race? We will encounter genres such as the Gothic novel, the realist novel, the magical realist novel, the novel of manners, the historical novel, and the crime novel. In the process, we will read Anglophone novels by authors from Britain, the United States, the Caribbean, and South Asia.

ENG 145 M001 Reading Popular Culture
T/TH 5:00-6:20 PM
Instructor: Hillarie Curtis
What is mass culture and why did theorists fear its power over consumers? What is popular culture and how do fans interact with the texts they encounter? What are the differences between the two? In this course, we will explore both of these large questions by engaging with theories of mass culture and popular culture. Tracking themes of fantasy and fear, alongside various theoretical modes concerning identity, we will identify the dominant ideologies these texts communicate, the modes of resistance available to consumers, and the various forces within fan culture operating around popular culture texts. Specific case studies may include episodes of Russian Doll or Stranger Things, the Marvel Cinematic Universe, BBC’s Sherlock, Overwatch, Disney Cartoons, and other texts. Students are encouraged to bring their own knowledge and interests into class assignments and discussion. Participation during classroom discussions, several short critical essays, weekly Blackboard posts, possible quizzes, and a final creative project will all be vital components to the class. Since this course has no scheduled screening, students will be required to view film and television texts on their own time as part of the course study load.

ENG 145 M010 Reading Popular Culture
M/W 2:15-3:35 PM
Instructor: Simon Staples-Vangel
What place and value do mass forms of entertainment, literature, and art hold for our lives? How do these texts shape our communities and identities? In what ways do genres interact across different media forms? How do we interpret the self-referential style that is so common in contemporary popular texts? Throughout this course we will be exploring these and other questions. Potential texts may include literature, such as Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, and John Lewis’ March, as well as television shows or films, such as Jackass and Night of the Living Dead. Primary and secondary readings will sometimes be supplemented with episodes of TV shows or films, either screened in class or to watch on your own. Though we will certainly explore fiction and issues of genre and world-building, parts of the course will cover non-fiction and the more diverse forms of popular media that we are all familiar with. Students will become familiar with the major approaches in the field of cultural studies and develop a critical vocabulary to talk about the media that is interwoven with their everyday lives.

ENG 145 M011 Reading Popular Culture
T/TH 3:30- 4:50 PM
Instructor: Evan Hixon
This course will serve as an introduction to the critical examination of mass consumer culture, the industries which produce that culture and the communities which emerge around popular texts. In this course, students will explore what defines a text as being a part of ‘popular culture’ and in doing so, the course will attempt to articulate what these objects of mass consumption and the modes of their consumption might teach us about the culture that produced them and the individuals that consumed them. We will challenge the common assumption which places popular culture texts as disposable objects of consumption and we will interrogate both why we view mass consumption this way and why it is important to move past this dismissal of these texts. We will examine questions concerning what makes an object part of popular culture and what the function of delineations between various kinds of artistic consumption serve. Covering a wide range of pop culture texts, from early cinema exploitation films to contemporary television, the goal of this course will be to understand the relationship between text, industry and audience to understand popular culture and to produce a sustained interrogation of seemingly disposable cultural artifacts that permeate our culture.

ENG 151 M001 Interpretation of Poetry
M/W 2:15-3:35 PM
Instructor: Bruce Smith
The course will consist of discussions of poems from the various traditions of poetry: from anonymous ballads to spoken word poetry. I’m interested in what makes the poem memorable and moving, how it is a vehicle for the intellect and the emotions, how it’s “the act of establishing communication between the mind and the heart”. I’m interested too in what ways the poem provokes and challenges us, what gives the poem its power to seduce and trouble and soothe, what gives it its music and voice as distinct from speech.
Students will be asked to write 6 two-page papers in which they examine closely a single poem by a poet from the text. Students may opt to write more papers (up to 8) and receive extra consideration for them. In addition, students will be asked to choose a poet and present the work of the poet in a 4 to 5-page paper. Emphasis in discussions is on style and substance, music and image. Multiple ways of reading poems will help the students expand the range of poetic possibilities.

ENG 153 M001 Interpretation of Fiction
MW 2:15-3:10pm
Discussion Section M003 F 10:35am-11:30am
Discussion Section M004 F 11:40am-12:35pm
Instructor: Erin Mackie
Cultures tell many of their most profound truths in their fictions. We will look at the truths of fictions across a range of narrative forms, from the faery tale to the novel. As we read we will develop an awareness of the elements of fiction: plot, setting, character, point-of-view, style, and theme. We will pay attention not only to the story told but also to who is telling it and to whom, its narrator and its audience. And always, we will think about the values, or truths, promoted by the fiction and the ends it seeks to achieve in its telling.

ENG 154 M002 Interpretation of Film
M/W 9:30-10:25 AM
Screening M002 M 7pm-9:45pm
Discussion Section M003 TH 3:30pm-4:25pm
Discussion Section M004 TH 5pm-5:55pm
Discussion Section M005 F 9:30am-10:25am
Discussion Section M006 F 10:35am-11:30am
Instructor: Roger Hallas
This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the interpretation of film. Regarded as the quintessential medium of the last century, cinema has profoundly shaped the ways in which we see the world and understand our place within it. Focusing principally on classical and contemporary English-language cinema, we will investigate precisely how meaning is produced in cinema. The course integrates a close attention to the aesthetic elements of film with a wide-ranging exploration of the social and cultural contexts that shape how we make sense of and take pleasure in films. We shall also devote attention to the question of history: How may one interpret a film in relation to its historical context? Film history incorporates not only the films that have been produced over the past one hundred years, but also an understanding of how the practice of movie going has transformed over time. No prior film experience needed. The weekly screenings scheduled for this course are required.

ENG 155 M002 Interpretation of Nonfiction
T/TH 3:30-4:50 PM
Instructor: Elizabeth Gleesing
This writing-intensive course introduces students to methods of interpreting nonfiction. While we often believe that nonfiction conveys truth and reality, in this course we will focus on how different texts construct their claims to truth and make arguments about reality. To do so, we will study and interrogate the rhetorical strategies authors employ, the relationship between form and content, the generic conventions of different nonfiction forms, and how texts construct both a speaking position and an audience. In addition to introducing students to ways to interpret nonfiction, this course aims to cover a wide variety of nonfiction media forms such as the essay, the graphic novel, autobiography, memoir, documentary video and digital documentary, reality television, photography, digital games, and digital nonfiction forms like listicles and memes. Potential course texts include Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home: A Family Tragicomic, Dorothy Allison’s Two or Three Things I Know for Sure, essays by Roxane Gay, Kiese Laymon, Errol Morris, George Orwell, and Susan Sontag, and visual and interactive works such as Cutthroat Capitalism, Do Not Track, and The Whiteness Project.

ENG 155 M003 Interpretation of Nonfiction
T/TH 5:00-6:20 PM
Instructor: Vicky Cheng
This course invites students to read and engage deeply with works of nonfiction through the practice of close reading, and a number of corresponding interpretive strategies. Throughout the semester, we will analyze various types of nonfiction, including genres such as the self-help text, investigative journalism, critical reviews, performance media, and multiple forms of online and audio-visual resources. Our textual materials will take shape around the following questions: how do we approach writing "based on the real" with such differing representations of what is, or can be considered real? How does the representation of "truth" take shape across different forms of media, and in specific social, cultural, and historic moments? Moreover, how do these understandings changed based on texts geared toward oneself, directed toward others, and toward understanding the world?

ENG 156 M001 Interpretation of Games
M/W 9:30-10:25 AM
Screening M001 W 7pm-9pm
Discussion Section M002 9:30am-10:25am
Discussion Section M003 10:35am-11:30am
Instructor: Chris Hanson
What are the roles of games and play in contemporary culture and how are these roles shifting? How do we “read” and interpret a game such as Red Dead Redemption 2 (Rockstar, 2018) or Super Mario Bros. (Nintendo, 1985)? How do we understand augmented reality games like Harry Potter: Wizards Unite (Niantic, 2019) or virtual and mixed reality experiences made possible by technologies such as the Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, and Microsoft HoloLens? How do games shape and change our interactions with the world and vice versa? This course will explore the evolving form of digital games, tracing their historical roots in traditional board games and other associated cultural modes of play to current and possible future iterations of video games such as esports. As we examine the development of games and their associated genres, we will investigate the historical, social, political, cultural, and economic contexts of individual games, and consider the relationship of games to other media forms and texts. We will explore the means by which we “read” and interpret games, linking these to the methods of reading and interpretation of other texts. This course serves as introduction to game studies and we will explore key critical frameworks and concepts for analyzing and understanding games and gameplay. In addition to games, we will also study screen-based media texts which explicitly or implicitly engage with the concepts of game studies. Attendance at a weekly discussion sections and evening screenings is required.

ENG 174 M001 World Literature--Beginnings to 1000 C.E.
T/TH 11:00-12:20 PM
Instructor: Harvey Teres
Interested in becoming a more informed global citizen? This course will introduce you to global cultures as you read and discuss some of the greatest hits of literature from African, Asian, and western traditions. You will also strengthen your awareness of contexts for understanding English and American literature and culture. We will begin with some of the oldest literature in the world (Gilgamesh and Egyptian love poems), and go on to read sections from the Hebrew Bible (the “Old” Testament), Sanskrit and Greek epics (The Ramayana and The Iliad), classical Chinese philosophy (Confucius and Zhuangzi), Greek and Roman lyric poetry (Sappho, Catullus, Horace, and others), The New Testament, Saint Augustine’s Confessions, Chinese Tang and Song dynasty poetry (Li Bai, Du Fu, Wang Wei, and others), excerpts from the Qur’an, stories from 1001 Nights, and excerpts from The Tale of Genji by the Japanese woman writer Murasaki Shikibu, arguably the first novel ever written. Classes will alternate between lectures and discussions. You will have the option of either producing shorter response papers or traditional midterm and final interpretive essays.

ENG 181 M001 Class and Literary Texts
M/W 2:15-3:35 PM
Instructor: Sean M. Conrey
From William Blake’s descriptions of living conditions in early industrialized England, James Agee’s stories of tenant farmers during the Depression, to Ursula LeGuin’s’s speculative fiction focused on labor exploitation, questions of social class have long been a focus of novelists’, poets’ and essayists’ work. Parallel to the ways that writers affect and engage social class, critical readers can engage with the concepts of social class as they read. Concerned with the social divisions of privilege, wealth, power and status, class, like race and gender, is a social construction that is imposed on, and performed by, all of us as a way of stratifying and defining who we are. Though the restraints of social class readily subject us to the power of others, these restraints may also, when well understood, provide a springboard for advocacy and direct social action. This course provides an introduction to these concepts and exposes students to key texts in literature, film and other media as a way of fostering critical engagement and developing richer social responsibility through textual interpretation.

ENG 181 M002 Class and Literary Texts
M/W 3:45-5:05 PM
Instructor: Alexandra O’Connell
Representations of social class and its intimate entanglement with race, gender, and sexuality have long been expressed in American literature and film. Looking across a wide range of texts and forms, from novels to music videos, fairy tales to film, this course will examine the relationship between texts and the construction and experience of class as a historical, theoretical, and lived experience. We will consider a few central questions throughout the course: how do these texts reflect, mediate, and challenge the ways that class serves to create stratifications, identities, and affects revolving around power, privilege, and wealth? How do these different texts (dis)engage with the idea of the American dream? How does class intersect with ideas about masculinity, queerness, utopia or dystopia, spatiality, temporality, and genre? In what ways can we catch glimpses or modes of resistance or coalition building in these texts? Potential texts and authors may include Audre Lorde, Toni Morrison, Richard Wright, Justin Torres, Alice Walker, The Florida Project, Paris is Burning, and Minding the Gap.

ENG 182 M001 Race and Literary Texts
M/W 3:45- 5:05 PM
Instructor: William Marple
What does it mean to say that race is a “social construct?” While it seems easy to recognize that the concept of race is largely a social category lacking a biological basis, it is not always quite so simple to account for the very real impact that race has on lived experience or the complex ways in which American culture and society have been largely defined by an obsession with phenotypical difference that dates back to the earliest days of the nation. The goal of this course is to explore literary and other cultural representations of race in the United States from the Revolution to the present. Through our engagement with these texts, we will attempt to interrogate the ways in which representations of racial categories emerge and re-emerge in particular cultural contexts, and to examine the ways in which these categories intersect with other categories like gender and sexuality. To address these questions, we will engage with a range of essays, short stories, poetry, and novels from such authors as Frederick Douglass, James Baldwin, Toni Morrison, Audre Lorde, and Gloria Naylor.

ENG 182 M002 Race and Literary Texts
T/TH 5:00 – 6:20 PM
Instructor: Deyasini Dasgupta
“What is race?” Is it based on biology? Is it, perhaps, a socially-constructed category? Does the categorization of race depend upon certain socio-cultural, economic, and/or political agendas? These questions mark the starting point of our discussions of race and literary texts in this class. Exploring the intersections between class, gender, sexuality and race, we will try to untangle some of the historical and lived experiences of racial identity. The aim of this class is to familiarize you with concepts of race, racism, racialized identities, and the problems of representation in literary texts, while providing opportunities for the development of your close-reading, writing, and critical analysis skills through the readings and assignments on the syllabus. To this end, our discussions will cover a wide range of time periods and literary genres, starting from early modern British drama like Shakespeare’s Merchant of Venice to graphic novels like Spiegelman’s Maus, from 20th century American novels like Larsen’s Passing to pop-culture texts like Beyonce’s Lemonade album. Other readings may include Alice Walker’s The Color Purple, Anna Deavere-Smith’s Fires in the Mirror, Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, Harriet Beecher Stowe’s Uncle Tom’s Cabin, and/or Claudia Rankine’s Citizen.

ENG 182 M004 Race and literary texts
M/W 5:15- 6:35 PM
Instructor:Wendy Jones
Construction and representation of race, especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts.

ENG 184 M002 Ethnicity and Literary Texts (meets with JSP 131, LIT 131, REL 131)
T/TH 11:00- 12:20 PM
Instructor: Kenneth Frieden
A wide-angle panorama of great stories written by Jewish authors, including Abramovitsh, Sholem Aleichem, I. L. Peretz, Franz Kafka, S. Y. Agnon, Elie Wiesel, and Yiddish women writers. Topics include narrative styles, parables, shtetl life in E. Europe, modernization, ideas of coherence and progress, radical textualism, love, marriage, and the Nazi genocide.

ENG 192 M001 Gender and Literary Texts
T/TH 2:00-3:20 PM
Instructor: TBA
Construction and representation of gender, especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts.

ENG 192 M002 Gender and Literary Texts (meets with WGS 192)
T/TH 9:30-10:50 AM
Instructor: Carol Fadda
In this course, students will read and analyze the portrayal and role of gender in a collection of literary texts, focusing on the ethnic, cultural, racial, sexual, historical, and creative implications of gender in relation to the texts' writers and characters. The selected literature includes novels, poems, essays, short stories, and graphic novel by the likes of Toni Morrison, Alison Bechdel, Randa Jarrar, and David Henry Hwang. This course is reading intensive, so students should be ready to handle rigorous reading assignments, accompanied by writing analytical papers that would reflect the students’ understanding of the issues raised in these texts. The main objective of this course is to develop students’ critical thinking capabilities as well as their analytical readings skills.

ENG 192 M003 Gender and Literary Texts
M/W 5:15-6:35 PM
Instructor: Melissa Welshans
As current social movements like #MeToo and the events that lead to them underscore, one's gender and how society defines gender have broad implications for how individuals experience the world around them. But what is "gender," how has it been defined, and by whom? And how can an understanding of "gender" enrich our interpretation of literature and media? This class takes an historical approach to these questions, examining literature and literary interpretations of literature from a wide array of time periods in Western Literature. We will engage with primary texts as varied as William Shakespeare's Taming of the Shrew and the 2014 film The Babadook, reading them alongside literary theory by a number of critics, including Simone de Beauvoir, Virginia Woolf, bell hooks, Audre Lorde, Judith Butler, Jack Halberstam, and others. This is a writing intensive course, so assignments will include at least two 6 page papers and weekly short writing assignments. This course will also include a presentation component.

ENG 192 M004 Gender and Literary Texts 
T/TH 2:00-3:20 PM 
Instructor: TBA 
Construction and representation of gender, especially as it affects the production and reception of literary and other cultural texts. 

ENG 215 M001 Introductory Poetry Workshop
M 12:45- 3:35 PM
Instructor: Brooks Haxton
Weekly meetings of this workshop will focus on careful, constructive analysis of student poems, and on supplementary readings of other poetry. Besides writing a new original poem weekly, everyone will revise at least four poems on the basis of the workshop response. Reading and writing assignments will be handed out as we go. No prerequisites.

ENG 217 M001 Introductory Fiction Workshop
M 12:45-3:35 PM
Instructor: Jonathan Dee
This course will acquaint students with some of the fundamental rules, tricks, pleasures, etc. of storytelling in prose. We will spend the first four weeks reading and analyzing published stories and completing in-class writing exercises. The final ten weeks of class will be devoted to the reading and constructive critique of short stories written by you. Class attendance and participation are mandatory.

ENG 217 M003 Introductory Fiction Workshop
Tues 2:30- 3:20 PM
Instructor: TBA
This course will acquaint students with the fundamentals of writing fiction. Each week students will read and critique fiction written by their peers, as well as published work by modern writers. Students must come to class prepared and willing to discuss these stories. There will be in-class writing exercises and prompts which will lead students to create stories of their own. Class attendance and participation are mandatory.

ENG 242 M001 Reading and Interpretation
T/TH 12:30-1:50 PM
Instructor: Christopher Forster
ENG 242 introduces students to the discipline of English and Textual Studies, stressing not what we read but how we read it. We will learn how meanings are created through acts of critical reading as well as demonstrate the consequences of pursuing one way of reading over another. This course is designed to enhance your ability to read and interpret contextually as well as closely, to help you to articulate your understanding effectively and to draw connections through reading and writing. Through close, deep and thoughtful reading of literary and non-literary texts as well as essays by critics and theorists, we will explore the ways readers produce meaning. These meanings are produced both from the perspective of each reader’s unique experiences, and through various critical and theoretical approaches. Each section of ETS 242 takes up issues of central concern within contemporary literary and cultural studies. These include representation, language, reading, authorship, subjectivity, ideology, culture, history and difference.

ENG 242 M002 Reading and Interpretation
M/W 12:45-2:05 PM
Instructor: Patricia Roylance
ETS 242 introduces students to the discipline of English and Textual Studies, stressing not what is read but how we read it—and the difference that makes. Its goal, in other words, is not only to show how meanings are created through acts of critical reading but also to demonstrate the consequences of pursuing one mode or method of reading over another. This course is designed to enhance your ability to read and interpret contextually as well as closely, to help you to articulate your understanding effectively and to draw connections through reading and writing. Through close, deep and thoughtful reading of literary and non-literary texts as well as essays by critics and theorists, we will explore the ways texts mean and the ways readers produce meaning. Each section of ETS 242 takes up issues of central concern within contemporary literary and cultural studies. These include representation; author/ity, textuality, and reading; subjectivity; and culture and history.

ENG 303 M002 Reading and Writing Fiction
T/TH 9:30-10:50 AM
Instructor: Sarah Harwell
All creative disciplines depend on the study and imitation of the particular art form for mastery of their elements. In this course you will read and analyze a number of short stories in order to deepen your understanding of a variety of concerns in storytelling, including voice, style, description, story, and character. We will attempt to answer the question: how have authors generated emotions, interest, and power in creative texts? You will be required to display an understanding of these issues by producing creative and analytical responses to the texts studied. Possible authors include Flannery O'Connor, Alice Munro, James Joyce, Edward P. Jones, Anton Chekhov, Donald Barthelme, ZZ Packer, Grace Paley and Raymond Carver.

ENG 304 M001 Reading and Writing Poetry
T/TH 12:30-1:50 PM
Instructor: TBA
T. S. Eliot said that minor poets borrow while great poets steal. From classical antiquity to the present, poets have always learned their trade by imitating other poets. They have pursued their individual talent by absorbing, assimilating, and in some cases subverting the lessons of the traditions they inherit. In this class, we will read and imitate poems from canonical poets. We’ll examine each poet closely, sympathetically, and predatorily. That is, we will read like aspiring writers, looking for what we can steal. We will deepen our understanding of a variety of poetic devices, such as diction, image, music, and metaphor. We will attend to each poet’s stylistic and formal idiosyncrasies, as well as his or her techniques and habits. You will be required to display an understanding of these issues by producing creative and analytical responses to the poets studied.

ENG 305 M001 Critical Analysis: Introduction to Cultural Studies
M/W 12:45-2:05 PM
Instructor: Crystal Bartolovich
What does it mean to be a “cultural critic”? We will answer this question by studying literature alongside mass cultural forms such as advertising, television shows, and digital culture as well as everyday practices, such as shopping, reading the news, or going to the movies, to try to understand how we learn to make sense of a globalizing world and live a particular culture—or cultures—in the U.S. today. This course will provide you with basic concepts and strategies to be able to begin to call yourself a cultural critic—a thoughtful, questioning reader. By comparing and contrasting the strategies of literary texts with other cultural forms and practices in specific situations we can consider what makes literature particular as a mode of signification (meaning-making). We will also learn the importance of situating everything we study—and ourselves-- historically. As the course progresses, you should become a more sophisticated, creative and critical reader of the world in which we live as you learn to see how literature works in, with, and against that world.

ENG 310 M001 Literary Periods: British Modernism
T/TH 3:30-4:50 PM
Instructor: Christopher Forster
The first half of the twentieth century was an especially turbulent and provocative time in art and literature. It was a period that saw the height of British Imperial power, of the “Great War,” and of rapid technological change (including the emergence of film as a major cultural form). This environment produced the art and literature frequently called “modernist.”
This class will focus on this period (roughly, 1890-1930) and the authors and literature of the British Isles (and a little beyond). We will begin with late nineteenth-century precursors (including writers like Wilde, Mallarme, and Flaubert), before spending the majority of the semester reading some of the major works of the first half of the twentieth century (in both poetry and fiction, and maybe some film). We will end by looking at work forward to the consequences of modernism in our own moment.
Writers we will study might include Ford Madox Ford, James Joyce, W. B. Yeats, Virginia Woolf, T. S. Eliot, Elizabeth Bowen, and others. Assignments include two major essays and shorter regular written responses.

ENG 311 M001 Love and Marriage in Renaissance England
Instructor: Wendy Jones
The Beatles once famously sang, "All you need is love." This course will take this phrase as a starting point for exploring "love" and its iterations in early modern England, especially as it relates to the institution of marriage. What was the status of "love" in the time of Shakespeare—a time when romantic ideals often conflicted with the realities of match-making? How was it defined, expressed, cultivated, destroyed? How did it manifest in marriage, and what were other acceptable (and transgressive) social sites of love? Texts under consideration will include literature and historical context from the time period as well as modern, scholarly research articles about this literature. Primary texts will likely include Shakespeare's Sonnets, Romeo and Juliet, and The Winter's Tale, Thomas Middleton and Thomas Dekker's The Roaring Girl, Elizabeth Cary's Tragedy of Mariam, as well as selections from a variety of poems by Thomas Wyatt, Edmund Spenser, and John Donne. Assignments will include at least one short paper, an oral presentation, and one longer research paper. Pre-1900 course. This course will meet the Shakespeare requirement for English Education Majors.

ENG 313 M001 Race and Literary Periods before 1900: American Beginnings
M/W 3:45-5:05 PM
Instructor: Patricia Roylance
When, where and with what does “American literature” begin? At stake in this question are our basic assumptions about what American-ness is, as well as our basic assumptions about what literature is. Who gets to be called an “American” and what counts as “literature”? Should Native American oral stories be part of the canon of American literature? How about the letters from Spanish and French explorers describing the Americas and its peoples? How about William Shakespeare’s The Tempest, which takes place on an island obviously inspired by the New World and which voices cutting critiques of colonization through its indigenous character Caliban? This class will place traditionally revered accounts of the British settlements at Jamestown, Plymouth, and Massachusetts Bay into the context of a more expansively defined “early America,” encompassing Native America, the colonial Americas (Spanish, French, British and Dutch), and the writers in Europe who were responding to the idea of the New World (new to them, at least).

ENG 315 M001 Ethnic Literatures and Cultures: The Holocaust in American Literature (meets w/JSP 300)
T/TH 2:00-3:20 PM
Instructor: Harvey Teres
If you believe awareness of the Holocaust and other examples of genocide should be a vital part of your education, this course is for you. We will explore the moral, religious, and artistic challenges faced by American writers who have represented the Holocaust and its aftermath in fiction, poetry, and non-fiction. Students will begin by reading a historical account of the Holocaust, followed by efforts to link the Holocaust to trauma studies, slavery, and other examples of genocide. We will spend the rest of the semester reading literary representations of the Holocaust and its aftermath. Texts will include Philip Roth’s “Eli, the Fanatic” and The Ghost Writer; Bernard Malamud’s “The Last Mohican” and “Lady of the Lake”; Jerzy Kosinski’s The Painted Bird, Cynthia Ozick’s “The Pagan Rabbi,” “The Shawl,” and “Rosa”; Jonathan Safran Foer’s Everything is Illuminated; Hannah Arendt’s Eichmann in Jerusalem; Art Spiegelman’s Maus I and Maus II; Michael Chabon’s The Final Solution; Nathan Englander’s “The Tumblers”; and selected poetry by Jacob Glatstein, Charles Reznikoff, W.D. Snodgrass, Sylvia Plath, Adrienne Rich, Anne Sexton, Anthony Hecht, Elie Wiesel, and others.

ENG 320 M001 Hollywood Directors of the 1950’s
T/TH 3:30-4:50 PM
Instructor: Will Scheibel
The 1950s was a decade of socio-cultural change in the United States after World War II and industrial reorganization in Hollywood. While surveying key Hollywood directors of the era, this course will introduce you to the critical, theoretical, and historical methods of studying film authorship. Beginning with “the auteur theory” in its French and Anglophone conceptions, we will think about the signature style and personal vision of a director in relation to film aesthetics, identity, and textual politics. We will then build from these formal issues to look at directors in midcentury U.S. contexts, including the Cold War, urbanization and suburbanization, ideologies of consumerism and popular art, and constructions of masculinity and youth culture. Finally, we will consider the practical conditions of working in the industry during the decline of the classical studio system: making films at independent production companies, pushing the boundaries of censorship, and cultivating a directorial celebrity. Cinema studies has long been invested in the Hollywood directors of this profoundly transformative decade. This course seeks to understand why, and also what their legendary films, careers, and reputations still have to teach us about the history of American cinema more broadly.

ENG 321 M001 Shakespeare’s Medieval World
T/TH 2:00-3:20 PM
Instructor: Patricia A. Moody
Shakespeare belongs unquestionably to the early modern period, yet his world was largely medieval. Almost half of Shakespeare’s plays have direct or indirect medieval sources, and such sources are present in others. Not only the theater itself, but what he read and wrote about show direct inheritance from the Middle Ages: the stories of Macbeth, Hamlet, and Lear; the feud of the Montagues and Capulets, the blend of comedy and tragedy, the very presence of kings and clowns on the same stage. We can recognize what Shakespeare achieved by recognizing how much the Middle Ages gave this greatest of playwrights to work with. We will examine this legacy from the medieval world, from mystery and morality plays, to medieval story tellers such as Chaucer; some works we will compare side by side

ENG 325 M001 The History and Varieties of English
T/TH 11:00-12:20 PM
Instructor: Patricia A. Moody
Want to know what runes are really about? Be able to decipher literature written in Anglo-Saxon? Read some Chaucer in Middle English? Better understand Shakespeare? Know what IPA is and how it is used? Learn why and how English speakers across the US and globe sound so different from “us”?
This course aims to provide students with as much knowledge as possible, as interactively as possible, of fundamental linguistic concepts, the basic structures of the English language and representations of its history. Equally important, the course aims to develop critical awareness of contemporary language issues and the complex ways in which language and our ideas about language embed attitudes in popular culture (including Disney!) about issues such as gender, race, and class.

ENG 340 M001 Theorizing Forms and Genres: Film Noir/Noir Cultures
T/TH 5:00-6:20 PM
Instructor: Will Scheibel
Film noir (or “black film”) is a French term used in reference to dark melodramas, mysteries, and crime thrillers, traditionally from 1940s and 1950s Hollywood, but its definition varies from a genre to a visual style to a historical period. This course argues that noir encompasses different film genres, styles, and periods, and must be understood in relation to cultural expressions other than film. We will look at the various influences on what came to be called “film noir,” and what noir has influenced in turn. Beginning with Classical Hollywood cinema, the course then spans the following “noir cultures”: radio, comics, and popular literature; jazz and blues; street photography; urban and suburban geography and architecture; fashion; television; video games; and contemporary African-American, feminist, and queer filmmaking. What cultural needs and desires does noir serve? What does noir illuminate (albeit darkly) about our culture? Texts under discussion will include Blues in the Night (1941), Murder, My Sweet (1944), Out of the Past (1947), The Naked City (1948), Sunset Boulevard (1950), Blade Runner (1982), the Twin Peaks pilot (1990), A Rage in Harlem (1991), Bound (1996), Mulholland Dr. (2001), In the Cut (2003), and the video game L.A. Noire (2011).

ENG 352 M001 Race, Nation and Empire: Transnational Arab America (meets with MES 300)
T/TH 12:30-1:50 PM
Instructor: Carol Fadda
This course will focus on contemporary Arab American literary and cultural texts, emphasizing their portrayal of Arab and Muslim identities and communities in the US, while at the same time delineating the strong roots and connections that link these communities to original Arab homelands, including Palestine, Lebanon, and Iraq, to name a few. In doing so, students will read an array of Arab American texts (including novels, poems, graphic novels, plays, and essays) as well as historical and critical texts that portray the effects of transnationalism, dual citizenship, diasporic identity, racialization, and imperial wars, with a particular focus on how they intersect with gender and sexuality. Course readings and discussions are also meant to help students address anti-Arab and anti-Muslim racism in the US that well precedes the events of 9/11 and the ongoing “War on Terror.” In developing complex understandings of Arabs and Muslims in the US and their transnational links to the Arab world, we will read works by Edward Said, Rabih Alameddine, Mohja Kahf, Wafaa Bilal, Randa Jarrar, and Ella Shohat, among others.

ENG 401 M001 Advanced Writing Workshop: Poetry
TH 3:30-6:15 PM
Instructor: TBA
This course is devoted to the poem and seeks to answer the question that all artists face: how does one transform feeling and experience into something more than the original impulse, how does one create art? You will develop your poetic skills by reading the work of published poets, writing a poem every other week, and critiquing one another’s poems. You will be expected to extensively revise four of the poems you write. The course is open to anyone who has taken the introductory poetry workshop (ETS 215). Juniors and seniors who have not had a workshop may submit a portfolio of four pages of original poetry to be considered for admission.

ENG 403 M001 Advanced Writing Workshop: Fiction
M 3:45-6:30 PM
Instructor: TBA
This fiction workshop will develop and expand upon the skills introduced in ETS 217. The primary focus will be on how to write better, more effective, more technically sophisticated short stories and/or novel excerpts; the secondary focus will be on how to critique constructively others’ work in these same forms. Most of the class will center on the writing and subsequent discussion of original work created by you; there will be some for-credit in-class writing exercises and previously published work to critique as well.

ENG 403 M002 Advance Fiction Workshop
T 3:30-6:15 PM
Instructor: Arthur Flowers
Standard workshop format of targeted readings, craft exercises, weekly critiques.

ENG 407 M001 Sexuality and Gender in Victorian Literature
T/TH 11:00-12:20 PM
Instructor: Coran Klaver
The Victorian period stands in an interesting relation to our own--with surprising correspondences and disjunctions. These are particularly compelling in the areas of gender and sexuality. Despite the impression of many, Victorian culture and practice was often quite queer, with a proliferation of non-normative and perverse genders and sexualities. In this course we will examine a range of literary and cultural texts that engage more or less explicitly with genders and sexualities that push the boundaries of the mainstream and normative. Our investigations will draw upon the insights of recent feminist and queer theory and the context provided by primary and secondary historical materials. Our reading will include fiction by Charlotte Bronte, Charles Dickens, Thomas Hardy, Robert Louis Stevenson, Bram Stoker, Oscar Wilde and poetry by Alfred Lord Tennyson, ‘Michael Field,’ Christina Rosetti, and others. This Advanced Critical Writing course will help you to hone your research and writing skills and engage in deep and sustained critical inquiry. This course can be used in place of ETS 305.

ENG 410 Practices of Games
M/W 3:45-5:05 PM
Instructor: Chris Hanson
This course will explore the evolving form of digital games, tracing their historical roots in analog board games and other associated cultural modes of play to current and possible future iterations of video games. We will employ a range of critical approaches to gaming; digital games will be “read” and critically interrogated as texts, and the relationships between game, player, design, software, interface, and structures of play will be discussed. We will explore analyzing and designing games to better understand the boundaries of what defines games and play in their separation from everyday life.

ENG 420 M001 Cultural Production and Reception: Reading Feeling
T/TH 3:30-4:50 PM
Instructor: Coran Klaver
What does it mean to read feeling? This course attempts to answer this question by using recent theoretical work on feelings and emotions as an analytical lens to examine a broad range literary and cultural studies. The course will be organized around several questions and problematics including: 1) the relationship between affect theory and psychoanalytic theory; 2) embodied affects; 3) sympathy and empathy as modes of communicating affect and emotion; 4) animal affects; and 5) specific emotional affect and emotional formulations such as melancholia, grief and mourning, shame and humiliation, love and intimacy, and hatred, particularly in relation to traumatic racial histories, the climate crisis, queer identities, and so forth. In order to explore these issues as well as to explore the role of literary texts in the expression and representation of affects, we will read one nineteenth-century novel, three twentieth-century novels, and a series of short texts including fiction and poetry.

ENG 494 Research Practicum
TH 3:30-6:20 PM
Instructor: Crystal Bartolovich
This one-credit course introduces students to the scope and demands of an honors and/or distinction project in ETS. Enrollment is by invitation to participate in the distinction program, and/or honors program, only. In five formal meetings, we will cover choosing an advisor, developing a suitable topic with engaging research questions, compiling a bibliography, reading critically, taking notes effectively, and writing a thesis proposal. Our work should prepare you to write your thesis in the spring semester, when you will enroll in ENG 495, Thesis Writing Workshop.

Graduate Courses

ENG 630 M001 Graduate Proseminar: Intro to Early Modern Studies
W 3:45-6:30 PM
Instructor: Stephanie Shirilan
This course provides a point of entry for students interested in early modern texts and the disciplinary history of early modern studies. We will begin with the modern disciplinary invention of the Renaissance in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries and will follow the rise and fall of formalisms, criticisms, materialisms and historicisms new and old through the early twenty-first century as we tackle the major generic forms of English Renaissance literature in a European, transatlantic, and global context. A chief concern of the course will be to examine the ways in which the early modern period has been both credited (and discredited) as the parent of modernity. Our discussions will trace the representation of raced, classed, and gendered identities and the concepts of privacy, sovereignty, embodiment, property, liberty, and ecology as these emerge out of the complex interplay between readers and writers of the sixteenth, seventeenth and twentieth/twenty-first centuries . We will read a selection of mainly canonical plays, poems and prose (including but not limited to drama, rhetorical theory, lyric and devotional poetry, spiritual autobiography, sermons) in order to give you a solid grounding and literacy in the field and establish a foundation necessary for evaluating its critical trends and histories.

ENG 630 M002 Graduate Proseminar: US Modernist Fiction
TH 12:30-3:15 PM
Instructor: Susan Edmunds
Course Description: This course offers an introduction to U.S. modernist fiction. We will read an array of texts associated with expatriate modernism, the Harlem Renaissance, the proletarian literature movement, and the complex, sometimes fraught relationship between U.S. modernism and U.S. mass culture. Throughout the semester, we will also be examining both literary and nonliterary early twentieth-century attempts to define: a) the nature of individual and collective mental experience; and b) the relationship of mental experience to social and historical change.
Readings will include: Gertrude Stein’s Tender Buttons; Jean Toomer’s Cane; Ernest Hemingway’s The Sun Also Rises; Dashiell Hammett’s Red Harvest; Nella Larsen’s Passing; William Faulkner’s The Sound and the Fury; Tillie Olsen’s Yonnondio; F. Scott Fitzgerald’s Tender is the Night; and Langston Hughes’s The Ways of White Folks.

ENG 631 M001 Critical Theory
TH 9:30-12:15 PM
Instructor: Crystal Bartolovich
“Critical Theory” provides an introduction to a range of meta-critical concepts, debates and protocols—that is, the underwriting assumptions (varied and contradictory as these may be) -- on which the discipline of “English” currently relies. We will read both influential texts from the past that are still referenced (implicitly or explicitly), as well as notable examples of current trends. We will also spend time considering professional structures, norms, genres and demands: the formation of the university, book reviews, bibliographies, conferences, journals, seminar papers, prizes and so on. In other words, we will explore ways of reading theoretical, critical and literary/cultural texts—including our profession as an institution--and examine how critical questions have been and are now generated in English, as well as why new critical practices emerge (or fail to do so). No matter how much (or little) “theory” you have already read, this professional orientation will direct your thinking toward “English” as a discipline in new ways, and prepare you to work within it self-consciously and critically.

ENG 650 Forms M001 Success & Significance
TH 3:30-4:50 PM
Instructor: Arthur Flowers
What constitutes literary success. Using the works of SU MFA alums who have gotten works published we will explore the dynamics of literary success and significance. Is it just getting books published. Is getting published the necessary 1st step or can literary significance be judged more broadly. What is the procedure of getting your work out there. What are the behavior patterns that facilitate literary success and / or significance. Why do certain works engage the cultural zeitgeist of their times and that of generations to come. Why do some works hit the cultural nerve. How do literary mobs facilitate individual and collective achievement. What are the challenges of surviving as a writer post program when the prevailing pattern is long years laboring in the vineyards and the only thing fatal is giving up. These are questions I’d like to ask.

ENG 650 Forms M002 Novel Structure
T 12:30-3:15 PM
Instructor: Dana Spiotta
Randall Jarrell famously described the novel as “a prose narrative of some length that has something wrong with it.” With that as a starting point, we will engage with questions about what a novel is and how it works. We will read a number of novels and discuss how they work on both a macro and micro level while giving particular attention to the architecture of the novel. The novels will be chosen for interesting approaches to form and for representing a diversity of narrative strategies. We will discuss how to write a long-form fictional project and think about various approaches to structure, organizing principles/conceits, schemata, outlines, and revision.

ENG 650 Forms M003 Fiction as Resistance
T 3:30-6:15 PM
Instructor: Wayétu Moore

Can fiction change the way a person votes? In this course, we will identify techniques used in fiction writing that engages with national and international social movements. We will read and discuss works within the genre, and consider how they offer political commentary and make ideological and socio-political arguments. The course will examine the history of protest literature, and also study its trajectory based on contemporary additions to the canon. Students will leave the course with a deeper understanding of the creative infrastructure of fiction as resistance, including plot and figurative language. We will also explore criticism of this form.

ENG 650 Forms M005 Contemporary Poets Mostly of color or LGBTQ
TH 12:30-3:20 PM
Instructor: Mary Karr
Revolutions: New Poetry Taking Over. This class will explore new books not from white, male, hetero-normative humans. The new works seem to be returning poetry to realms of emotion (in reader, not necessarily writer) and away from the glib, clever, cool, obtuse, hermetic, intellectual and (often) unfelt lands of Symbolism/Surrealism that have (arguably) dominated poetry in English since Eliot. The class will start with two weeks studying that tradition and include readings from Eliot, Stevens, Yeats, Octavio Paz, and Jose Ortega y Gassett It’s my contention that the excitement of these new works isn’t sparked by need for social hygiene, but from aesthetic desperation—an emotional/spiritual need that has fortunate socio-political aspects. The following twelve weeks will be drawn from Hanif Abddurraqib, Kaveh Akbar, Chase Bergrrun, Jericho Brown, Natalie Diaz, Terrance Hayes, Christine Kitano, Ada Limon, Sally Wen Mao, Morgan Parker, Sam Sax, Nicole Sealey, Solmaz Sharif, Paul Tran, Ocean Vuong, Erin Williams (graphic novel) Jenny Xie, Kevin Young. Students will choose poets to present on, and we will watch video of the poets.

ENG 650 Forms M006 Prose Poetry and Flash Fiction
TH 9:30-12:15 PM
Instructor: Christopher Kennedy
In the past twenty years or so, the prose poem and flash fiction (aka micro-fiction, sudden fiction, micro-story, etc.) have emerged as viable sub-genres. Though both forms have a long history, in recent years a number of print and on-line journals and anthologies have begun to feature work from these two sub-genres, and some new journals are devoted exclusively to the forms. Despite the proliferation of “pp/ff,” as one anthology characterizes the work, defining the difference between the two is often a difficult and perplexing task. Why is one piece of writing a prose poem and another of similar length a work of flash fiction?
This class will provide an opportunity to explore prose poetry and flash fiction with the goal of distinguishing the characteristics that make them separate forms while identifying their commonalities.

ENG 715 M001 First Poetry Workshop
W 12:45-3:30 PM
Instructor: Brooks Haxton
Students in this workshop will write one poem each week and revise at least four of these into carefully considered versions on the basis of workshop analysis. Reading and writing assignments will address issues that arise in workshop. Admission is strictly limited to first-year students in the MFA Program in Poetry.

ENG 716 M001 Second Poetry Workshop
M 3:45-6:30 PM
Instructor: Bruce Smith
Students in this course will be asked to write twelve poems, one “free” poem to push back against the world with the imagination per week. The emphasis will be both on the craft -- the language and the shaping and forming of the writing, and the imagination -- the vision that's unique to each individual. Classroom work will consist primarily of workshop style discussion of student work, although each class will begin with poems, ancient and modern, as model or target for discussions of technique as well as examples of tapping the resources available to the writer. This term I’ll begin class with what I call, an “exemplary” poet – avoiding the more proscriptive term “essential.” Exercises will include ways to locate the source of your poems as well as ways to "music" them, to shape them, and to revise them.

ENG 717 M001 First Fiction Workshop
W 12:45-3:30 PM
Instructor: Dana Spiotta
This is a required fiction workshop for MFA students in their first year.

ENG 718 M001 Second Fiction Workshop
M 9:30-12:30 PM
Instructor: Jonathan Dee
This workshop will focus on fiction writing and the useful critique thereof. We will read and discuss two or three student-submitted stories/novel excerpts each week. Open to second-year fiction MFA students only.

ENG 719 M001 Third Poetry Workshop
W 12:45-3:35 PM
Instructor: Mary Karr
This is an advanced course, so I assume you’re all passionate about poetry and motivated enough to read a) write, b) critique each other’s work with utmost care and respect, c) rewrite and rewrite and rewrite. It’s a class based almost entirely on revision, so your notes on each other’s poems should be detailed and serious. I’d also like to see your revisions fairly regularly in conference, and for you to keep different drafts of the same poems. First and foremost, you must get along with each other, and anyone engaging in an ad hominem attack on anyone else in the group will be asked to leave the room. No violence, no threats of violence. You can be ironic about yourselves or me but not each other. Congeniality is a requirement for the class. You can disagree with each other, but I expect respectful comments and tone. Anyone unable to get along will not pass the class. Often people say, “We don’t have to love each other…” This class works best if we love each other. It’s part of my pedagogy.
If yall agree we’ll take turns reading one of yall’s work per week—6-12 poems per week depending on length.

ENG 721 M001 Third Fiction Workshop
TBA
Instructor: George Saunders
In this class (which is required of, and restricted to, third-year MFA fiction students) students will deepen their fictive practice by reading and critiquing the work of their peers. Although we will go where this takes us, this class often concerns a refinement of the students’ practice of editing and revision, via close-reading.

ENG 730 M001 Novel in the Age of Austen
T 9:30-12:15 PM
Instructor: Mike Goode
The “age of Austen” in the course’s title refers both to the historical era in which Jane Austen (1775-1817) lived and wrote domestic novels and to the contemporary global media ecology in which these novels, their remixes, and their remediation’s have so thoroughly saturated culture that her name has become almost as recognizable as Shakespeare’s. About two-thirds of the course will be devoted to locating Austen’s corpus within the complexities of the late-eighteenth and early-nineteenth-century historical context in which it was produced, including the broader literary marketplace. In addition to reading about half of Austen’s complete literary output, we will be reading novels and poems by several of her contemporaries, including some combination of Fanny Burney, Ann Radcliffe, William Godwin, Maria Edgeworth, Byron, and Walter Scott. For the final third of the course, we will be thinking more about Austen’s novels as media by analyzing what has been made of them in and through various other new media, including film, theater, fanfiction, fan websites, mash-ups, and games. The course is part historicist cultural history, part media history, part reception study, part fan study, and part media theory. [Note: Any ETS Distinction students considering taking this course, please be aware that, by doing so, you would not be eligible in spring 2020 to participate in the “ETS 400: Jane Austen in Context,” short-term study-abroad program.]

ENG 730 M002 The literature of Slavery & Social Change in the U.S. 1840-1870
TH 3:30-6:20 PM
Instructor: Dorri Beam
In this course we will survey the literature of slavery and social change across three broad and intertwined social movements: Abolition, Communitarianism, and Women’s Rights.
The Civil War is often considered a second (unfinished) American Revolution and the period surrounding it presents a particularly rich field for examining the ways that literary and social experiment intersect. We will explore the range of imaginative ideas --inventive temporalities (millennialism, revolution, utopia), new models of social relation (the commune, racial equality, the abolition of marriage), and resistant practices and geographies (underground railroads, marronage, diaspora)— that gave expression to a variety of political and social aims.

Local historical contexts in CNY, such as the Underground Railroad, the Oneida Community, Seneca Falls, and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, will provide important historical models and social ideas, while readings in critical race theory; queer theory; animal studies, ecocriticism, and other new materialisms; Afrofuturism/utopian studies; and the burgeoning field of African American print culture will invigorate our approach. The course will treat an array of writers, but foregrounds African American writing, especially fiction, and the Abolitionist movement.

Possible texts include: David Walker’s Appeal, Nat Turner’s Confessions, Margaret Fuller’s Woman in the Nineteenth Century, Sojourner Truth’s narrative, Ralph W Emerson’s essays “Self-Reliance,” “Friendship,” and his Antislavery Address, Frederick Douglass’ My Bondage and My Freedom and The Heroic Slave, Hannah Crafts’ The Bondwoman’s Narrative, Martin Delany’s Blake; Or, The Huts of America, Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, Herman Melville’s “Paradise of Bachelors” and “The Tartarus of Maids,” and “Benito Cereno,” Stowe’s Dred: Or, A Tale of the Dismal Swamp,” Frances Harper’s magazine fiction, Rebecca Harding Davis’s stories. The course closes with a consideration of Reconstruction as an extension of the period’s radical social experiment in the memoirs of TW Higginson (Army Life in a Black Regiment) and Charlotte Forten Grimke (“Life on the Sea Islands”) and in retrospective fictional treatments from Charles Chesnutt, Kate Chopin, and Constance Fenimore Woolson.

ENG 730 M003 Writing & Filming Photography
T 3:30-6:15 PM
Instructor: Roger Hallas
Although many theories of photography have sought to differentiate the medium’s unique and specific qualities, its relationship to language and writing has shaped its meaning and uses since its origins in the mid-nineteenth century (from the reliance on words to frame the presentation of photographs to the attempts to conceive of photography as a language). The invention of cinema at the turn of the century further complicated its status since the new medium relied on a photographic basis for its technological apparatus, but it also reconstituted time and movement that had been stilled by the photograph. Thus photography has sustained a complex relationship to both writing and cinema since the end of the nineteenth century. This seminar will explore the diverse intermedial practices that have connected photography with cinema and writing in the 20th and 21st centuries. We shall begin with an examination of the conceptual foundations of photography and film within the historical context of industrial modernity, focused around ideas of indexicality, spatiotemporal relativity, motion/stillness and montage. The bulk of the semester will then be devoted to investigating how diverse forms of cinema and writing (literary fiction, critical essays, documentaries, experimental film and narrative cinema) have critically and creatively interrogated the photographic image, the photograph as object, the event of photography and photographic archives. We shall conclude by assessing contemporary transmedia practices that combine film, photography and writing through integrated photobooks, essay films and web documentaries. Some of the filmmakers, photographers and writers we will study include Eadweard Muybridge, Langston Hughes, Chris Marker, Agnès Varda, Julio Cortazar, Susan Sontag, Ariella Azoulay, Michelangelo Antonioni, Akram Zaatari, W.G. Sebald and Susan Meiselas. Film screening required.